Colours/finishes

See also

PS-F9

(1983)

PS-F9, picture by Nick Jarman

This is as close as Sony ever got to producing a Walkman for LP records and 45 rpm singles. The bulk and sensitivity to shock made the medium unsuitable for mobile use but the PS-F9 was nevertheless battery operated and played through stereo headphones, making it a clear member of the Walkman family. Text copyright © Walkman Central. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

In simple terms the PS-F9 was a direct drive turntable with a linear tracking tonearm, like so many others in the Sony range. To make it usefully portable the turntable itself had been shrunk down to a hub about the same size as a record label onto which the record was securely held by a motorised clamp. Despite the machine being both small and restricted to a limited source of power the turntable motor was still quartz locked, an impressive feat given all the other engineering problems that also had to be solved. Text copyright © Walkman Central. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

Removing the front cover reveals the PS-F9's tonearm, picture by Nick Jarman
Removing the front cover reveals the PS-F9’s tonearm

The stubby tonearm and its moving magnet cartridge were completely contained inside the machine and were drawn across the record by a motor and cord drive. Cueing and search controls allowed any track of an LP to be found quickly and easily. Records could be played with the machine in either a vertical or a horizontal position with equal ease, for vertical use a set of small feet could be splayed out at the base as an aid to stability. Text copyright © Walkman Central. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

The built-in equaliser and amplifier allowed two pairs of headphones to be used, there was also an equalised line-level output for use with an external amplifier or tape recorder (the instructions showed a WM-D6C!). Although not especially popular at time or practical the PS-F9 is a very good example of Sony’s engineering ability in the early 80s, it is unlikely that they would be capable of producing such a machine today. Text copyright © Walkman Central. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.